RCSC 2021 Virtual Conference Program

Please find below the Conference Program for RCSC 2021. We look forward to welcoming you to our first virtual (Zoom) conference. This year, we will host a virtual mixer on Friday, March 19th before the conference on Saturday, March 20th. Click for registration and payment details.

Renaissance Conference of Southern California
64th Annual Conference

Abraham Ortelius, Typus orbis terrarium, 1587
Image: Abraham Ortelius, Typus orbis terrarium, 1587, 093:214 M.
Huntington Rare Books Maps, The Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

Friday, 19 March 2021
❧ 5:00–6:30pm Pacific ❧
WELCOME RECEPTION AND VIRTUAL HAPPY HOUR

Welcoming remarks, Barbara Mello, RCSC President
Introduction to the Huntington Library, Steve Hindle, W. M. Keck Foundation Director of Research at The Huntington Library

Saturday, 20 March 2021
❧ 8:45–9:00am Pacific ❧
WELCOME AND OVERVIEW OF ZOOM LOGISTICS

❧ 9:00–10:30am Pacific – SESSION ONE ❧

Breakout Room 1 – Rhetoric and Action in Early Modern English Drama
Chair: Kay Stanton (California State University, Fullerton)
Peter Andersson (Örebro University), “The Elizabethan Clown and Popular Culture: Traces of Improvisation in the Clowning of Will Kemp”
Heather Bailey (Alcorn State University), “Fletcher’s Schoolroom: Actio as Humanist Pedagogy in The Two Noble Kinsmen”
Margaret Mendenhall (University of Texas at Austin), “Spectacles of Penance: Performance, Revision, and Remorse in The Roaring Girl”

Breakout Room 2 – Religious Responses to Disease in Renaissance Italy
Chair: Sophia Quach McCabe (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Kristin Noreen (Loyola Marymount University), “Deliverance from Disease: The Power of Intercession and the Role of Icons in Rome”
Emily Jay (Texas Tech University), “Hollow, Hallowed Body: Santa Rosalia and the Reconstruction of Identities in Palermo during the 1624 Plague”
Alaurea Holder (Texas Tech University), “The Plague of San Carlo: Secular and Ecclesiastical Response to the 1576 Plague of Milan”

Breakout Room 3 – Producing British Royalty
Chair: Marlin E. Blaine (California State University, Fullerton)
Carol Blessing (Point Loma Nazarene University), “Appropriating the Sacred: Hal’s Unholy Confessions”
Gabriel Lonsberry (Purdue University), “Princess Elizabeth’s Wedding and the Contested Stuart Court Stage”
Jordan Hugh Sam (University of California, Los Angeles), “‘Passing the Love of Women’: Homoerotic Musical Anthems in the Court of King James VI and I”

❧ 10:30–10:45am Pacific – BREAK ❧
❧ 10:45am–12:15pm Pacific – SESSION TWO ❧

Breakout Room 1 – Hegemony and (Resistance to) Change in the Later English Renaissance
Chair: Marlin E. Blaine (California State University, Fullerton)
Adrienne Eastwood (San Jose State University), “Queering the Imperial Narrative: Aphra Behn’s The Widow Ranter and the Complications of the American Experiment”
Chloé Roberts (University of California, Santa Barbara), “Satan’s Invisible World Discovered? George Sinclair’s World of Scottish Demonology”
Aisha Hussain (University of Salford), “‘My weakness cannot forfeit his esteem’: Tyranny and Passivity in the Ottoman Court in Fulke Greville’s Mustapha (1609) and Roger Boyle’s Mustapha (1665)”

Breakout Room 2 – Art and Politics
Chair: Letha Ch’ien (Sonoma State University)
Rachel Miller (California State University, Sacramento), “The Church Triumphant and the Pedagogy of Fear: Muslim Stereotypes in the Church of San Francesco Saverio in Naples”
Laura Price (University of Minnesota), “The Heavens Declare: Astronomy in the Sacred Art of Baroque Rome”
Lina María Rodríguez Perico (Columbia University), “Felicitas in Italian Renaissance Visual Culture: The Role of Sixteenth-Century Visual Sources in the Re-Appropriation of Classical Motifs”

Breakout Room 3 – Shakespeare and Wisdom Literature: Hospitable Exchanges
Chair: Barbara Mello (California State University, Long Beach)
Julia Reinhard Lupton (University of California, Irvine), “Shakespeare, Other Wise”
Unhae Park Langis (University of California, Irvine), “Othello: Christian-Islamic Crossings in the Quest for ‘Perfect Soul’”
Sheiba Kian Kaufman (University of California, Irvine) “Persian Paradigms of Hospitality”

❧ 12:15–1:30pm Pacific – BREAK ❧

❧ 1:30–3:00pm Pacific – SESSION THREE ❧

Breakout Room 1 – Art in/and Literature
Chair: Barbara Mello (California State University, Long Beach)
Elizabeth Mazzola (The City College of New York), “Hat Tricks: Dressing for Modest Success, Immoderate Distress, and Quick Egress in Early Modern Ballads”
Elizabeth Lagresa-González (University of British Columbia), “Pictorial and Literary Exchanges in Cervantes’ Self-Portrait”
Victoria Pipas (Dartmouth College), “House, Gardin, and chambre: Tapestry Form and the Construction of Courtly Space in Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene”

Breakout Room 2 – Cultural Modalities in Italy
Chair: Brittany Asaro (University of San Diego)
Maria DePrano (University of California, Merced), “‘Space and Place in Artisans’ Homes in Renaissance Florence”
Enrico Carnevali (University of Chicago), “Tasso and the Framing of the New Interdisciplinary Intellectual”
Jim Short (University of California, San Diego), “The Spectator’s Thirst for Unpredictability: Commedia dell’Arte and Risk-Making”

Breakout Room 3 – Shakespeare: Politics, Morality and Ethics
Chair: Martine van Elk (California State University, Long Beach)
Andrew Griffin (University of California, Santa Barbara), “Julius Caesar Without Republicanism”
Jim Kearney (University of California, Santa Barbara), “What Wretches Feel: Shakespeare’s Experiments in Affective Ethics”
Kent Lehnhof (Chapman University), “Speaking with the Body: Political Speech and Ethical Saying in Coriolanus”

❧ 3:00–3:15pm Pacific – BREAK ❧

❧ 3:15–5:00pm Pacific – PLENARY ROUNDTABLE ❧
“Interdisciplinary Research and the Renaissance: How to Do It”
Moderator: Sophia Quach McCabe (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Amy Buono (Art History, Chapman University)
Katherine Powers (Music, California State University, Fullerton)
Martine van Elk (English, California State University, Long Beach)

❧ 5:00 – 5:15 Pacific – CLOSING REMARKS ❧

Promoting study of the period c. 1300–1800